Towns and villages

Towns & Villages

Y trefi a’r pentrefi hynod ddiddorol o amgylch Mynyddoedd Cambria

The Cambrian Mountains benefit from a necklace of beautiful villages and towns – perfect for a rainy day!

Tregaron – market town in the heart of drovers’ country

Llangurig – a small town with a 15th Century church, on the banks of the River Wye among beautiful rolling hills

Pontrhydfendigaid – an historic village near the source of the Afon Teifi, gateway to Strata Florida Abbey and the Teifi Pools

Rhayader – Outdoor Capital of Wales and gateway to the Elan Valley with its visitor centre, reservoirs and Dark Skies

Rhandirmwyn – historic mining settlement in the beautiful upper Tywi valley and one-time hideout of Twm Sion Cati – ‘the Welsh Robin Hood’

Cilycwm –  on the west bank of Afon Gwenlais, a tributary of the Tywi, north of the town of Llandovery

Llanddewi Brefi – on the banks of the Afon Brefi in Ceredigion, in one of the largest parishes in Wales and the site of St David’s 520 AD Synod of Brefi. Famous waterfalls and narrow gauge railway.

Llanwrtyd Wells – gateway to the Irfon Valley and Abergwesyn Common; home of Bog Snorkelling and the World Alternative Games!

See also: Green Events – ‘wacky, weird and wonderful outdoor activities in and around Llanwrtyd Wells’

Talybont – surrounded by old woollen mills, silver and lead mines

Llanidloes – historic market town – the first on the River Severn

Machynlleth – home of the Centre for Alternative Technology, MOMA (Museum of Modern Art) and the Owain Glyndwr Centre

Cwmystwyth – an upland agricultural village which was home to one of the largest lead mines in Wales.  Its history and heritage are described in this community-published bilingual book Cofio’r Cwm Cwmystwyth The Valley Remembered

Corris – former slate mining village, home of the Corris Railway

Ystrad Meurig – the Edward Richard Centre

Ponterwyd – home of “Bwlch Nant yr Arian”, a Natural Resources Wales centre where up to 150 red kites are fed daily, and The George Borrow Hotel, named after writer George Borrow who reported his travels through Wales on foot in the 1860s in the his book Wild Wales